They Hacked A Coffee Maker

With the name Smarter, you might expect a network-connected kitchen appliance maker to be, well, smarter than companies selling conventional appliances. But in the case of the Smarter’s Internet-of-things coffee maker, you’d be wrong.
As a thought experiment a researcher reverse engineered one of the older coffee makers to see what kinds of hacks he could do with it. After just a week of effort, the unqualified answer was: quite a lot. Specifically, he could trigger the coffee maker to turn on the burner, dispense water, spin the bean grinder, and display a ransom message, all while beeping repeatedly. Oh, and by the way, the only way to stop the chaos was to unplug the power cord.
Yes, anything can be hacked. Welcome to the Internet of Things. If you haven’t heard this term before here’s a simple definition:
In the broadest sense, the term IoT encompasses everything connected to the internet, but it is increasingly being used to define objects that “talk” to each other. “Simply, the Internet of Things is made up of devices – from simple sensors to smartphones and wearables – connected together,”
Matthew Evans, the IoT programme head at techUK, says.
But do we really need to be that connected? Do I need to start my coffee while I’m driving home from work at the expense of my privacy? What do you think?

Kids Smartwatch Security Nightmare

Kids’ Smartwatches Are a Security Nightmare Despite Years of Warnings
Five out of six brands tested by researchers would have allowed hackers to track kids—and in some cases eavesdrop on them.
CONNECTING EVERY POSSIBLE device in our lives to the internet has always represented a security risk. But that risk is far more pronounced when it involves a smartwatch strapped to your child’s wrist. Now, even after years of warnings about the security failings of many of those devices, one group of researchers has shown that several remain appallingly easy for hackers to abuse.
When WIRED asked Schinzel if three years of security analyses gave him the confidence to put these smartwatches on his own children, he answered without hesitation: “Definitely not.” ays Sebastian Schinzel, is a Münster University computer scientist who worked on the study and presented it at the International Conference on Availability, Reliability, and Security in late August.
What are your thoughts? We would recommend NOT giving smartwatches to children, and limiting their personal electronic use for health and privacy reasons.

 

Dirty Electricity Interview

What are the physical effects of prolonged, constant exposure to the electromagnetic radiation coming off of your personal devices, smart appliances even household wiring?

At what point is the need for faster data transmission speeds outweighed by the negative health outcomes of the technology? Are we already there with 5G?

What can you do to lessen your exposure to harmful levels of radiation given off constantly by our “civilized” world?

Author and certified EMF expert Bill Cadwallader joins the program to discuss the effects of “dirty electricity” and proposes things you can do today to protect yourself.

Listen to it here today! 

Practice Safe Tech

 

There’s a lot of confusing information out there about how electronics effect our health. 5G is just one hot-topic discussion. Are you looking for actionable items and bypass all the techno-babble? This book is for you and has some edgy photos which might just catch the attention of your skeptic teenagers. Leave it out on the coffee table and see if they pick it up. Get it here:

Quick and Easy EMF Guide

Step Away From The TV

Step Away From The TV

As many of us are spending extra time at home right now, here are some tools to reduce your technology use.
IT’S TOO EASY TO BE A TECH ADDICT.
Also: check out the rest of this website: 24SixLife.com for amazing insight on the benefits of Technology Shabbats. Enjoy!

“These tools will help you unplug on your day away from screens and stay focused the other six days of the week.
Take a Facebook Sabbatical

Click HERE for the steps to take a Facebook Sabbatical for a month, a week, or just a couple of days.
Set Your Phone on Do Not Disturb with Brick™ Mode

Worried someone’s going to need to reach you while you’re off your phone? Here’s a tip from our partner Brick™: how to set up a text auto-reply for your phone-free time.
Add the “Momentum” Chrome Extension to Stay Focused Throughout the Week
Add the Momentum Extension for Chrome HERE
Set up your account
Prioritize your tasks by inputting your “Main Focus” for the day
Every time you open your Chrome browser or a new tab Momentum will remind you of your Main Focus for the day. Add and check off tasks as you please!
Now you can stay more focussed and less distracted when using screens six days of the week as you are constantly reminded of your goals each day!
Pause Incoming Emails with “Boomerang” for Gmail
Download Boomerang for Gmail HERE
Follow instructions on the following page to set up your Boomerang application
Now in the upper left corner of your Gmail page you will find a “Pause Inbox” button that allows you to fight email overload and stay more productive! When composing an email, you can also schedule it to send at a later time with the red “Send Later” button.”

Smart Homes Might Be Getting Too Smart– Start Worrying.

Commentary:
“When better features mean worse ethics, should we change what we buy?
An Amazon Echo is across the room, and I’m playing a recording of the wake word “Alexa” over and over again at various decibel levels. It’s a relatively simple test — one that I’ve performed in some shape many times over the years — and I’m consistently impressed. Smart speakers like Amazon’s growing roster of Echos and Google’s Home and Nest devices, it turns out, are really good at listening to you. Like really good.

In testing the newest Echo Dot, for instance, I could stand 30 feet away and speak at a low level, and Alexa would still respond. But could a better design make a smart speaker worse for the customer?

There’s not a simple answer to that question, but it’s a question we need to be asking nonetheless — and not just about smart speakers…”
Check out the rest of the article here:
https://www.cnet.com/…/smart-homes-might-be-getting-too-s…/…