They Hacked A Coffee Maker

With the name Smarter, you might expect a network-connected kitchen appliance maker to be, well, smarter than companies selling conventional appliances. But in the case of the Smarter’s Internet-of-things coffee maker, you’d be wrong.
As a thought experiment a researcher reverse engineered one of the older coffee makers to see what kinds of hacks he could do with it. After just a week of effort, the unqualified answer was: quite a lot. Specifically, he could trigger the coffee maker to turn on the burner, dispense water, spin the bean grinder, and display a ransom message, all while beeping repeatedly. Oh, and by the way, the only way to stop the chaos was to unplug the power cord.
Yes, anything can be hacked. Welcome to the Internet of Things. If you haven’t heard this term before here’s a simple definition:
In the broadest sense, the term IoT encompasses everything connected to the internet, but it is increasingly being used to define objects that “talk” to each other. “Simply, the Internet of Things is made up of devices – from simple sensors to smartphones and wearables – connected together,”
Matthew Evans, the IoT programme head at techUK, says.
But do we really need to be that connected? Do I need to start my coffee while I’m driving home from work at the expense of my privacy? What do you think?

Kids Smartwatch Security Nightmare

Kids’ Smartwatches Are a Security Nightmare Despite Years of Warnings
Five out of six brands tested by researchers would have allowed hackers to track kids—and in some cases eavesdrop on them.
CONNECTING EVERY POSSIBLE device in our lives to the internet has always represented a security risk. But that risk is far more pronounced when it involves a smartwatch strapped to your child’s wrist. Now, even after years of warnings about the security failings of many of those devices, one group of researchers has shown that several remain appallingly easy for hackers to abuse.
When WIRED asked Schinzel if three years of security analyses gave him the confidence to put these smartwatches on his own children, he answered without hesitation: “Definitely not.” ays Sebastian Schinzel, is a Münster University computer scientist who worked on the study and presented it at the International Conference on Availability, Reliability, and Security in late August.
What are your thoughts? We would recommend NOT giving smartwatches to children, and limiting their personal electronic use for health and privacy reasons.

 

How Coronavirus Is Eroding Privacy

 

“In South Korea, investigators scan smartphone data to find within 10 minutes people who might have caught the coronavirus from someone they met. Israel has tapped its Shin Bet intelligence unit, usually focused on terrorism, to track down potential coronavirus patients through telecom data. One U.K. police force uses drones to monitor public areas, shaming residents who go out for a stroll.

American officials are drawing cellphone location data from mobile advertising firms to track the presence of crowds—but not individuals. Apple Inc. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google recently announced plans to launch a voluntary app that health officials can use to reverse-engineer sickened patients’ recent whereabouts—provided they agree to provide such information…”

We didn’t write it, we’re just sharing the information.  Find the rest of the article HERE

 

San Diego Mass Surveillance Without Oversight

City of San Diego Awarded GE Mass Surveillance Contract Without Oversight.
San Diego is now home to the largest mass surveillance operation across the country

While the California Legislature passed and Governor Brown signed the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) into law in 2018, ostensibly to help California consumers protect their online data, state and local government doesn’t appear to be required to comply with this law.

Recently we learned that the Department of Motor Vehicles is earning more than $50-million a year by selling California drivers’ personal information, and the public is not offered an opt-out option of sharing personal information.

Now we learn that San Diego City Attorney Mara Elliott gave the approval to General Electric to outfit 4,000 new “smart street lights” with cameras and microphones in 2017. These CityIQ Nodes are listed on this city map and in the screen shot below.
The City of San Diego appears to now be in the business of enabling mega-data companies to cash in on city residents’ privacy.

Want to know more? Check out the rest of the story HERE.

How To Delete The Siri Recordings Apple Has Saved Of You

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Apple is giving users more control over data. “In July, Apple admitted it had been storing and listening to users’ interactions with the digital assistant as a way of improving Siri. The recordings didn’t have identifiable information, but could potentially contain private conversations. Shortly thereafter, Apple paused the program and promised to give users the option to opt in to it, which we’re now seeing in iOS 13.2…”

We care about your privacy, and wanted to share the rest of this article with you HERE. 

How Amazon Will Take Over Your House

How Amazon Will Take Over Your House

How Amazon Will Take Over Your House
What’s happening: Amazon’s newest offering, a deal announced last week with Realogy, connects homebuyers to real estate agents and gives them $5,000 in smart devices and services when they close the deal. The huge upside for Amazon is unchecked access to the data-rich interiors of our homes.
 
On paper, Amazon is giving out cool stuff for free. But the company is also getting “extremely inexpensive access to record some of the most intimate parts of your life,” says Meredith Whittaker, co-founder of the AI Now Institute.
 
Want to know more? Check out the article here.  
#StopDirtyElectricity #Amazon #surveillancecapitalism #AmazonEcho #Ring