Which light bulb should I use?

Frequently I get asked which are the safest light bulb.

In short, the old style light bulbs are the best, but they are not always available.

A little history –  Thomas Edison invented the first feasible light bulb in the late 1800’s. That type of bulb was used for more than 100 years and called incandescent light bulbs.
In 2007, the U.S. Federal Government outlawed the future manufacture and importing of most of these bulbs.  They did this for energy savings.

“The U.S. Federal Government started phasing out incandescent light bulbs in 2012, starting with the 100-watt bulb, and then followed by the 75-watt,” explained Melissa Andresko, communications director for lighting-automation company Lutron.

As of January 1, 2014 most of the 60- and the 40-watt bulbs went away.

Now we have 3 choices of light bulbs:

LED & CFL Bulbs

1 – CFL’s – Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs – Worst
2 – LED’s – That are Non-Dimmable – OK
3 – New Halogen Bulbs that screw into light sockets – Best

1 – CFL’s have a number of problems.
Most CFL’s create Wireless & WiFi radiation and Dirty Electricity.

CFL’s have mercury in them and have to be disposed as a hazard waste.

Mercury is very toxic. In fact, it is a neurotoxin, meaning that it harms the brain and nervous system. It is also linked to kidney and liver damage and possibly cancer. Children are especially at risk because their brains and bodies are still developing. Many health effects of mercury can be permanent.

Dentists must also take care to manage their mercury-containing dental waste. Dental offices in Washington State are required to use and maintain a dental amalgam separator.

Washington State has recently added a surcharge of $1.00 for a package of 4 bulbs to cover the cost of disposing this hazard waste.

CFL’s contain so much mercury that the EPA and state environment officials consider them to be a hazard if they break.
They cannot be placed in landfills because thousands of decaying or broken bulbs would cause noticeable mercury contamination.

CFL’s are not allowed to be thrown normal trash.

** Below are the clean-up instructions from the U.S. EPA. **

2 – LED’s tend to be better.   Always buy the Non-Dimmable.
I would recommend that you buy a Dirty Electricity Meter to measure any LED’s you have.
If you don’t have a Dirty Electricity Meter to test the LED’s, purchase NON-Dimmable LED’s.
There are some NON-Dimmable LED’s, though, that still create Dirty Electricity.
ALL Dimmable LED’s will create Dirty Electricity.

3 – New Halogen Bulbs that screw into light sockets.
These new Halogen Bulbs save electricity.
They generate NO Electromagnetic Radiation.
Best option.

4 – ** If you break a CFL bulb in your home, the following are the clean-up instructions from the U.S. EPA:

Before Cleanup

1. Have people and pets leave the room, and avoid the breakage area on the way out.
2. Open a window or door to the outdoors and leave the room for 5-10 minutes.
3. Shut off the central forced-air heating/air conditioning (HVAC) system, if you have one.
4. Collect materials you will need to clean up the broken bulb:
o Stiff paper or cardboard
o Sticky tape (e.g., duct tape)
o Damp paper towels or disposable wet wipes (for hard surfaces)
o Glass jar with a metal lid (such as a canning jar) or a sealable plastic bag(s)

________________________________________
Cleanup Steps for Hard Surfaces
1. Carefully scoop up glass fragments and powder using stiff paper or cardboard and place debris and paper/cardboard in a glass jar with a metal lid. If a glass jar is not available, use a sealable plastic bag.
NOTE: Since a plastic bag will not prevent the mercury vapor from escaping, remove the plastic bag(s) from the home after cleanup.
2. Use sticky tape, such as duct tape, to pick up any remaining small glass fragments and powder. Place the used tape in the glass jar or plastic bag.
3. Wipe the area clean with damp paper towels or disposable wet wipes. Place the towels in the glass jar or plastic bag.
4. Vacuuming of hard surfaces during cleanup is not recommended unless broken glass remains after all other cleanup steps have been taken. [NOTE: It is possible that vacuuming could spread mercury-containing powder or mercury vapor, although available information on this problem is limited.] If vacuuming is needed to ensure removal of all broken glass, keep the following tips in mind:
o Keep a window or door to the outdoors open;
o Vacuum the area where the bulb was broken using the vacuum hose, if available; and
o Remove the vacuum bag (or empty and wipe the canister) and seal the bag/vacuum debris, and any materials used to clean the vacuum, in a plastic bag.
5. Promptly place all bulb debris and cleanup materials, including vacuum cleaner bags, outdoors in a trash container or protected area until materials can be disposed of. Avoid leaving any bulb fragments or cleanup materials indoors.
6. Next, check with your local government about disposal requirements in your area, because some localities require fluorescent bulbs (broken or unbroken) be taken to a local recycling center. If there is no such requirement in your area, you can dispose of the materials with your household trash.
7. Wash your hands with soap and water after disposing of the jars or plastic bags containing bulb debris and cleanup materials.
8. Continue to air out the room where the bulb was broken and leave the HVAC system shut off, as practical, for several hours.
If you have further questions, please call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222.

________________________________________

Cleanup Steps for Carpeting or Rugs

1. Carefully scoop up glass fragments and powder using stiff paper or cardboard and place debris and paper/cardboard in a glass jar with a metal lid. If a glass jar is not available, use a sealable plastic bag.
NOTE: Since a plastic bag will not prevent the mercury vapor from escaping, remove the plastic bag(s) from the home after cleanup.
2. Use sticky tape, such as duct tape, to pick up any remaining small glass fragments and powder. Place the used tape in the glass jar or plastic bag.
3. Vacuuming of carpeting or rugs during cleanup is not recommended unless broken glass remains after all other cleanup steps have been taken. [NOTE: It is possible that vacuuming could spread mercury-containing powder or mercury vapor, although available information on this problem is limited.] If vacuuming is needed to ensure removal of all broken glass, keep the following tips in mind:
o Keep a window or door to the outdoors open;
o Vacuum the area where the bulb was broken using the vacuum hose, if available, and
o Remove the vacuum bag (or empty and wipe the canister) and seal the bag/vacuum debris, and any materials used to clean the vacuum, in a plastic bag.
4. Promptly place all bulb debris and cleanup materials, including vacuum cleaner bags, outdoors in a trash container or protected area until materials can be disposed of. Avoid leaving any bulb fragments or cleanup materials indoors.
5. Next, check with your local government about disposal requirements in your area, because some localities require fluorescent bulbs (broken or unbroken) be taken to a local recycling center. If there is no such requirement in your area, you can dispose of the materials with your household trash.
6. Wash your hands with soap and water after disposing of the jars or plastic bags containing bulb debris and cleanup materials.
7. Continue to air out the room where the bulb was broken and leave the H&AC system shut off, as practical, for several hours.
If you have further questions, please call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222.

________________________________________
Future Cleaning of Carpeting or Rugs: Air Out the Room During and After Vacuuming
1. The next several times you vacuum the rug or carpet, shut off the Heating & Air Conditioning system if you have one, close the doors to other rooms, and open a window or door to the outside before vacuuming. Change the vacuum bag after each use in this area.
2. After vacuuming is completed, keep the Heating & Air Conditioning system shut off and the window or door to the outside open, as practical, for several hours.

If you have further questions, please call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222.

Which light bulb should I use?

Which light bulb should I use?

Frequently I get asked which are the safest light bulbs.

In short, the old style light bulbs are the best, but they are not always available.

A little history –  Thomas Edison invented the first feasible light bulb in the late 1800’s. That type of bulb was used for more than 100 years and called incandescent light bulbs.
In 2007, the U.S. Federal Government outlawed the future manufacture and importing of most of these bulbs.  They did this for energy savings.
“The U.S. Federal Government started phasing out incandescent light bulbs in 2012, starting with the 100-watt bulb, and then followed by the 75-watt,” explained Melissa Andresko, communications director for lighting-automation company Lutron.
As of January 1, 2014 both the 60- and the 40-watt bulbs went away.

Now we have 3 choices of light bulbs:

LED Bulbs

1 – CFL’s – Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs
2 – LED’s
3 – New Halogen Bulbs that screw into light sockets – Best

1 – CFL’s have a number of problems.
Most CFL’s create Wireless & WiFi radiation and Dirty Electricity.
CFL’s have mercury in them and have to be disposed as a hazard waste.
Mercury is very toxic. In fact, it is a neurotoxin, meaning that it harms the brain and nervous system. It is also linked to kidney and liver damage and possibly cancer. Children are especially at risk because their brains and bodies are still developing. Many health effects of mercury can be permanent.
Dentists must also take care to manage their mercury-containing dental waste. Dental offices in Washington State are required to use and maintain a dental amalgam separator.
Washington State has recently added a surcharge of $1.00 for a package of 4 bulbs to cover the cost of disposing this hazard waste.
CFL’s contain so much mercury that the EPA and state environment officials consider them to be a hazard if they break.
They cannot be placed in landfills because thousands of decaying or broken bulbs would cause noticeable mercury contamination.

CFL’s are not allowed to be thrown normal trash.

** Below are the clean-up instructions from the U.S. EPA. **

2 – LED’s tend to be better.
I would recommend that you buy a Dirty Electricity Meter to measure any LED’s you have.
If you don’t have a Dirty Electricity Meter to test the LED’s, purchase NON-Dimmable LED’s.
There are some NON-Dimmable LED’s, though, that still create Dirty Electricity.
ALL Dimmable LED’s will create Dirty Electricity.

3 – New Halogen Bulbs that screw into light sockets.
These new Halogen Bulbs save electricity.
They generate NO Electromagnetic Radiation.
Best option.

4 – ** If you break a CFL bulb in your home, the following are the clean-up instructions from the U.S. EPA:

Before CleanupUnknown dangers of broken ECO light-bulbs
1. Have people and pets leave the room, and avoid the breakage area on the way out.
2. Open a window or door to the outdoors and leave the room for 5-10 minutes.
3. Shut off the central forced-air heating/air conditioning (HVAC) system, if you have one.
4. Collect materials you will need to clean up the broken bulb:
o Stiff paper or cardboard
o Sticky tape (e.g., duct tape)
o Damp paper towels or disposable wet wipes (for hard surfaces)
o Glass jar with a metal lid (such as a canning jar) or a sealable plastic bag(s)
________________________________________
Cleanup Steps for Hard Surfaces
1. Carefully scoop up glass fragments and powder using stiff paper or cardboard and place debris and paper/cardboard in a glass jar with a metal lid. If a glass jar is not available, use a sealable plastic bag.
NOTE: Since a plastic bag will not prevent the mercury vapor from escaping, remove the plastic bag(s) from the home after cleanup.
2. Use sticky tape, such as duct tape, to pick up any remaining small glass fragments and powder. Place the used tape in the glass jar or plastic bag.
3. Wipe the area clean with damp paper towels or disposable wet wipes. Place the towels in the glass jar or plastic bag.
4. Vacuuming of hard surfaces during cleanup is not recommended unless broken glass remains after all other cleanup steps have been taken. [NOTE: It is possible that vacuuming could spread mercury-containing powder or mercury vapor, although available information on this problem is limited.] If vacuuming is needed to ensure removal of all broken glass, keep the following tips in mind:
o Keep a window or door to the outdoors open;
o Vacuum the area where the bulb was broken using the vacuum hose, if available; and
o Remove the vacuum bag (or empty and wipe the canister) and seal the bag/vacuum debris, and any materials used to clean the vacuum, in a plastic bag.
5. Promptly place all bulb debris and cleanup materials, including vacuum cleaner bags, outdoors in a trash container or protected area until materials can be disposed of. Avoid leaving any bulb fragments or cleanup materials indoors.
6. Next, check with your local government about disposal requirements in your area, because some localities require fluorescent bulbs (broken or unbroken) be taken to a local recycling center. If there is no such requirement in your area, you can dispose of the materials with your household trash.
7. Wash your hands with soap and water after disposing of the jars or plastic bags containing bulb debris and cleanup materials.
8. Continue to air out the room where the bulb was broken and leave the HVAC system shut off, as practical, for several hours.
If you have further questions, please call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222.
________________________________________

Recycle CFL Bulbs

Cleanup Steps for Carpeting or Rugs

1. Carefully scoop up glass fragments and powder using stiff paper or cardboard and place debris and paper/cardboard in a glass jar with a metal lid. If a glass jar is not available, use a sealable plastic bag.
NOTE: Since a plastic bag will not prevent the mercury vapor from escaping, remove the plastic bag(s) from the home after cleanup.
2. Use sticky tape, such as duct tape, to pick up any remaining small glass fragments and powder. Place the used tape in the glass jar or plastic bag.
3. Vacuuming of carpeting or rugs during cleanup is not recommended unless broken glass remains after all other cleanup steps have been taken. [NOTE: It is possible that vacuuming could spread mercury-containing powder or mercury vapor, although available information on this problem is limited.] If vacuuming is needed to ensure removal of all broken glass, keep the following tips in mind:
o Keep a window or door to the outdoors open;
o Vacuum the area where the bulb was broken using the vacuum hose, if available, and
o Remove the vacuum bag (or empty and wipe the canister) and seal the bag/vacuum debris, and any materials used to clean the vacuum, in a plastic bag.
4. Promptly place all bulb debris and cleanup materials, including vacuum cleaner bags, outdoors in a trash container or protected area until materials can be disposed of. Avoid leaving any bulb fragments or cleanup materials indoors.
5. Next, check with your local government about disposal requirements in your area, because some localities require fluorescent bulbs (broken or unbroken) be taken to a local recycling center. If there is no such requirement in your area, you can dispose of the materials with your household trash.
6. Wash your hands with soap and water after disposing of the jars or plastic bags containing bulb debris and cleanup materials.
7. Continue to air out the room where the bulb was broken and leave the H&AC system shut off, as practical, for several hours.
If you have further questions, please call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222.
________________________________________
Future Cleaning of Carpeting or Rugs: Air Out the Room During and After Vacuuming
1. The next several times you vacuum the rug or carpet, shut off the Heating & Air Conditioning system if you have one, close the doors to other rooms, and open a window or door to the outside before vacuuming. Change the vacuum bag after each use in this area.
2. After vacuuming is completed, keep the Heating & Air Conditioning system shut off and the window or door to the outside open, as practical, for several hours.
If you have further questions, please call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222.

– See more at: https://stopdirtyelectricity.com/which-light-bulbs/#sthash.SyQ7DVQE.dpuf

Welcome to Stop Dirty Electricity

Welcome to Stop Dirty Electricity

Bill CadwalladerHey, this is Bill Cadwallader with StopDirtyElectricity.com.

I have many things to chat with you about Electromagnetic Radiation.

You say, what is Electromagnetic Radiation?

This harmful radiation is caused by our modern day lifestyle and the myriad of electronics that surround us today.

We will be discussing the sources of this radiation and how you, in most cases, can reduce over 90% of this radiation by taking some simple, easy-to-do steps to protect your home, family, kids, environment and yes, even your pets – please don’t forget your pets.

Before I forget, if you have not received my free report on

10 Things You can do NOW to Minimize Radiation Exposure in your HOME

Please do that now – it’s on the Home Page right below the Welcome Video:

https://stopdirtyelectricity.com/

So stay tuned.   If you find it helpful, please share this with your friends.

The first radiation is Electric.

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This Electric Radiation is now present in almost all homes.  A major source of Electric Radiation is the wiring in your walls and any visible wires.We can reduce the effect of this radiation with a few, easy steps.

Recently we did an home audit for a couple where the man was very skeptical.

When I followed up with the wife a few days later, she had to admit, she had the best night’s sleep – in as long as she could remember! The next time I spoke with her, her husband – you remember the skeptic – had to admit, he couldn’t remember when he had slept so well.

Boy, am I happy to hear this common result again, and again.

Another type is Magnetic Radiation.

Magnetic Radiation is produced any time electricity is flowing through a wire.

Many articles have been written about Magnetic Radiation and the effects are normally reduced just by moving 2 to 6 feet away.

A third type of radiation is Wireless / WiFi / RF radiation. This is caused by many modern electronics like cell phones, tablets, baby monitors, cell towers, etc.

box risks

If you’re not using a wireless electronic device then just turn it off or put it into airplane mode turned ON and Bluetooth & WiFi turned OFF.

The free report –

10 Things You can do NOW to Minimize Radiation Exposure in your HOME

  • deals with quick and easy ways to reduce your exposure to Wireless / WiFi / RF radiation.

Finally, the 4th type of Electromagnetic Radiation is termed Dirty Electricity.

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It is sad, but La Quinta Middle School had off-the-chart high Dirty Electricity levels.  Unfortunately, 16 teachers had 18 cancers at the school and several have died.

I know one teacher personally, she said the very day she started, she found out that one teacher had died of cancer and 2 others had cancer. After teaching there for 3 years, she realized nothing was going to be done and she moved on to a different school.

And if that is not bad enough, at last count, we know up to 37 students attending that school who developed cancer starting in their 20’s – with one student at age 15.

We will be discussing all of these radiations and how to get rid of them on this site.

Thanks again for finding the Website

www.StopDirtyElectricity.com

And if you find it helpful, again please share these blogs with friends and relatives.

Hope to hear your own comments when you begin to follow these tips.